This information changes to reflect current statistics. Reporting by many agencies is on a periodic basis rather than ever year:

  • The current rate of diagnosis of all Diabetes is one new case every 30 seconds, or 2880 new Diabetes cases every day globally. 
  • One person dies every 7 seconds from Diabetes related causes globally.
  • 29 million Americans have Diabetes
  • 1.9 million are Type 1
  • Type 1 Diabetes comprises 5 -10% of the total diabetes population making it a rare disease.
  • Type 1 Diabetes comprises about 27 million of the total cases globally.
  • Type I is increasing at the rate of 21% per year in the U.S.
  • Type II is increasing at the rate of 39% in the U.S.
  • Diabetes has a current world statistic of 412 million people, (Type 1 and Type 2) diagnosed.
  • It is expected there will be in excess of 552 million people diagnosed globally by 2030, almost doubling the current cases being diagnosed. 5.5 million of them will be Type 1.
  • Diagnosis of all diabetes is now crossing age, weight, ethnic and socio-economic boundaries once thought to be static. 
  • The age of diagnosis is decreasing over time and is being diagnosed among smaller children and babies in increasing numbers for both types.
  • Of children being diagnosed with Type 1 Diabetes, 96% of children under age 3 and 67% under age 5 will suffer death or permanent lifetime handicap equal to the severity of Diabetic Keto-acidosis at the time of diagnosis.

 

  • Finland has the highest diagnosis of Type 1 Diabetes globally.  
  • Colorado has the highest rate of diagnosis of Type 1 Diabetes in the United States, and is closely followed by Minnesota and Pennsylvania.  Reporting by providers and states may not accurately the actual numbers and this may be under-reported.
  • At the time of it's release in 1927 insulin was priced at less than $25 US a vial.
  • Pricing has increased to approximately $300 US a vial. Average usage being 2-4 vials per month.
  • Testing strips necessary for self dosing of insulin average a cost of $2 US per strip for 8-14 strips a day ($16 - $24 US daily). 
  • Insurance coverage for these lifesaving supplies is lacking for many or grossly inadequate for the larger community.

 

(Statistics courtesy of CDC, IDF, and NIH.)